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News Middle East & Africa

In Abu Dhabi, a significant number of people has developed a resistance to antibiotics.(Photo: holbox/Shutterstock)
Sep 10, 2012 | News Middle East & Africa

Antibiotic resistance rate increases in Abu Dhabi

by Surgical Tribune

ABU DHABI, UAE: The development of antibiotic resistance among human pathogens in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi is of serious concern, according to preliminary findings from the Abu Dhabi Antibiotic Resistance Surveillance Report 2011. Several relevant resistance rates have significantly increased compared with published local rates in previous years.

As reported by AMEinfo.com, of particular concern in health-care settings is the prevention and control of multidrug resistant organisms, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococci, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella strains, and multiple-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and other organisms with relevant single or multiple resistances.

“The processes of how and why micro-organisms become resistant to antimicrobials are quite well understood but complex and involve many factors,” Dr Jens Thomsen, Section Head, Occupational and Environmental Health, Public Health and Policy Division, Health Authority - Abu Dhabi, told the website. “At a cell and molecular level, micro-organisms have over time developed several mechanisms to combat antimicrobials, either by spontaneous mutation or by gene transfer from other micro-organisms of the same or even other species. At a higher level, the inappropriate and irrational use of medicines provides favourable conditions for resistant micro-organisms to emerge and spread.”

Resistance to drugs could lead to longer and more expensive hospital stays or even to the death of patients.

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